Sunday, June 14, 2009

Memorable Game 3: Strange Brew, I Beat a Master, A Shocking Discovery, etc. RLP - B. Davis 01.07.87 1-0

The only time I ever beat a USCF Master in a tournament game was strange brew indeed; I had been playing well in the previous weeks and was really looking forward to the game, but my opponent, Bill Davis, a 20-something guy who had passed 2200 a few months earlier, looked kind of distraught, or perhaps had been drinking or something...anyway, he didn't look happy to be there.

I had been studying the heck out of the Exchange Variation of the Queen's Gambit around this time, and his 7. ...b6 was a big surprise. It was a move that in similar situations had led to many brilliant victories by Pillsbury and Marshall back around the turn of the (20th) century. I knew it couldn't be good, so I buckled down and calculated the game line to the win of a pawn; except I guess he didn't want to lose that pawn...and allowed a mate in one. I was so shocked and even dismayed that I got up from the board instead of playing the mate, took a turn around the room to calm my nerves and when I came back he was gone, the clock stopped. I guess I was subconsciously giving him a chance to resign instead of getting mated inside of 10 moves, and he did.

I went on to defeat two USCF Experts (2000+) in the following months but this remains my only defeat of a Master. I've never felt any deep satisfaction with it, naturally. I think I need to go and get another...

(show chess board)(hide chess board)

7 comments:

Chessaholic said...

I can see why you're not deeply satisfied beating a Master this way, but hey, a win is a win, and you can always say you out-prepared your opponent :)

chesstiger said...

Indeed, a big oversight of the master. But like aholic says, a win is a win.

Chad Bam said...

Great story! Be satisfied, you won. Everyone has bad days, your opponent just happened to have a really bad day, but you prepared and were ready to capitalize on it. How many people can say they beat a master in 10 moves? I'd frame the PGN!

Aaron DeWeese said...

Very interesting experience! It comes off sounding a bit surreal--the mystery of Davis' attitude, your shock and dismay at the mate in one, your leaving the table, his vanishing act and resignation...

I am still struck by the novelty of having the ability to be audience to chess games from the near and distant past (by way of electronics, not psychic powers, of course). NEAT!

Eric Shoemaker said...

Hi Robert, it seems your opponent may have been the victim of residual memory. In his mind, his Knight on 'f6' may still have been there, as your 8. Bxf6 is not necessary or normal in the position.

bill davis said...

Hi Robert, Good game as you deserved the win with your preparation. I'd have played out the game if I knew this would become your blog. I'd like to make a few corrections. No, I hadn't been drinking or something else. Also I had been a Master for two years at the time of the game. I do remember the disgust and frustation when I realized I had blundered away a pawn. I don't see the mate coming within ten moves as you stated. I saw a very difficult position and would probably drop the c-pawn too with your pressure. So leaving a mate on the board was my frustrated way of resigning.In hindsight I should have played on as now I have the experience of saving such games. Well done, hope you get the chance to beat another Master.

Wahrheit said...

Thanks you very much for your comment Bill, I published a new post with corrections.